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Tory ‘high flyer’ sacked for foul-mouthed rant against Diane Abbott MP

Hallam: outburst at Abbott

Conservative party ‘high flyer’ Edward Hallam was relieved of his post as Conservative Future National Campaigns Co-ordinator after a foul-mouthed expletive-filled facebook posting about Labour leadership contender Diane Abbott.

Hallam called the MP a “foul, ignorant, conceited c***” saying “She’ll make a great Labour leader.”

“She’s a poisoned well, her policies are hate and bile, and she’s intellectually illiterate with a chip on her shoulder.”

The 25-year-old, Derby-born Hallam, a court shorthand writer and prolific Conservative Future website blogger, featured prominently in the youth wing of the UK Conservative Party, taking a prime spot on the front page of the Conservative Future website until the Party was contacted by the Sunday Mirror and his details were taken down.

But Hallam should have taken his own advice – Speaking as co-editor of The Young Conservative blog in a 2008 interview, a younger and seemingly wiser Hallam told Young Britain’s Foundation – ‘ Training the activists of tomorrow today’:

“My concern with the gossip blogs is that so much of what they publish isn’t backed up supporting evidence – its conjecture and, at times, verges on libel”.

On preparing politicians to face the media he said:

“Take media training, I think it’s crucial to be savvy on camera or around a journalist. But then you look at the recent profile of CF in the Financial Times and it’s apparent some members really ought to have known better. I think if they’d be trained in political technology they’d have thought twice about some of the things they did and said. I was with the journalist who wrote that article for days on end in Crewe, and frankly we got off lightly, when you consider some of the silly things said”.

He continued:

“We believe the conservative movement is strongest when it’s broad and deep. That means we’ll carry all strands of thought, all conservative opinions, though we may not personally endorse them”.

Way to go!?

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9 Responses

  1. Strong words of hate with some racial intonations is a major worry indeed. He has done the Conservatives a disservice and has given New Labour a sheild to hide behind. The most worrying part for me is that this latest rant has come from a 25 year old; one we can say is one for the future.

    When is British politics going to rise above this sort of prejudice? I am very glad that Diane had taken the brave steps forward to contest for leadership of her party.

    Which ever way you look at it, or whatever the outcome, Diane has written her name in history; and it is a far more positive one than New Labour and its woeful achievements of the last 13 years.

  2. I do not condone the forms of outburst shown in the article but the truth is Diane Abbott would simply not make a very good New Labour Leader.

    She disagrees with the Iraq War, (so I suppose that she is fine with Saddam Hussein mistreating his people and gassing the kurdish people, invading kuwait, Iran, setting fire to oil wells etc.).

    You cannot, as a good leader, have wildly different opinions to the majority of your members and your team. This does not make for a very organised group.

    Saddam Hussein needed to be dealt with. The people of Iraq could not received aid from America, UK etc. because he, quite simply, ‘nicked’ the lot. He hoarded countless billions of dollars and was the very epitome of a derranged Fascist Dictator. His sons, who could have easily inherited father’s position, were complete psychopaths. The ‘House of Saddam’ was in no way a ‘containable threat’. Even if he was, I would not advocate the hardships and genocide he had committed as a by-product of us containing him. There is also indisputable evidence that he harboured Al-Qaeda within Iraq. An UN member country is constitutionally not permitted to harbour an international criminal organisation.

    I also don’t think that you can have too many people running as a candidate. Diane Abbott is one of the least popular candidates because she is, stubbornly, a ‘grass-roots’ campaigner with very little demonstrated understanding of the concepts involved in the modern political world. She also appears to advocate ‘Old Labour’ ideas, of which I think this country has moved on from. Particularly by being an MP earning over £60,000 a year in a safe seat, she just doesn’t appear to understand the needs ot the modern working individual.

    Diane Abbott has been critical of private schools, chastising Tony Blair for such a thing, yet she sent her child to one and tried to justify this hypocricy. This demonstrates a Tory sympathy that appears out of place with the ‘grass roots Labour’ image she attempts to maintain.

    Diane Abbott’s mannerisms are derived from her hyper-awareness of her physical traits. She has demonstrated forms of racially derived thought which few can identify with. Individuals are finding it difficult to criticise her without her supporters pulling out ‘the race card’. It is making debate difficult and it is unfortunate that someone’s opinions have been released in this way, albeit in an expletive manner with little substance.

    “Black” and “Female” should not be deemed the two most exiting things a candidate brings to a leadership election. It just doesn’t deliver the good people are looking for.

    Personally, I am not too convinced that any of the candidates can bring Labour back to an effective party. I think that, as much as she had the obvious right to stand, Diane Abbott has focused predominantly on attention rather than real politics and her focus expenses on the leadership election is losing money for Labour party and therefore to its detriment. It is also causing serious divisions within the party. Similarly to how BOTH Miliband brothers are running.

    The bulk of the leadership election has more in common with Britain’s Got Talent than with politics.

    • Joshua,

      ‘I do not condone the forms of outburst shown in the article but’

      I’d yawn if this cliche was worth the effort, but I’m not going to.

      ‘She disagrees with the Iraq War’

      Well yes she did. And, I think quite a few others did too. By the way, Ed Miliband is quite vocal about saying that he thinks the war in Iraq was wrong. Does that mean he is not appropriate as a potential leader?

      ‘There is also indisputable evidence that he harboured Al-Qaeda within Iraq’

      Hand it over then, we await in great anticipation. By the way, you should probably let the Prime Minister know too.

      ‘You cannot, as a good leader, have wildly different opinions to the majority of your members and your team. This does not make for a very organised group.’

      Actually Joshua, there were 122 Labour MPs who backed a rebel backbench amendment that the case for war with Iraq was “unproven”. http://bbc.in/c2aK93

      ‘Individuals are finding it difficult to criticise her without her supporters pulling out ‘the race card’

      So far, you have said: ”I do not condone the forms of outburst shown in the article but’, followed later by ‘Individuals are finding it difficult to criticise her without her supporters pulling out ‘the race card’. You are painting a revealing picture of yourself.

      ‘Diane Abbott’s mannerisms are derived from her hyper-awareness of her physical traits’

      Oh, please do explain yourself sir.

      Imran

    • Joshua,

      “She disagrees with the Iraq War,”

      The aftermath of the war has proven her to be right. Good judgement and great foresight are one of the many positive traits of a great leader. I tick her box on that one.

      “You cannot, as a good leader, have wildly different opinions to the majority of your members and your team. This does not make for a very organised group.”

      A good and strong leader is one who makes an unpopular decision on the onset, but, later on turns out to be right in the future. Diane again is winning on that front.

      “Saddam Hussein needed to be dealt with.”

      Only by the citizens of Iraq; not the coalition of the willing.

      “There is also indisputable evidence that he harboured Al-Qaeda within Iraq.”

      This has yet to be proven.

      “An UN member country is constitutionally not permitted to harbour an international criminal organisation.”

      Neither are they constitutionally permitted to breach the UN Charter which the coalition of the willing did in illegally invading Iraq and plunging that country into dispair.

      “Diane Abbott is one of the least popular candidates because she is, stubbornly, a ‘grass-roots’ campaigner with very little demonstrated understanding of the concepts involved in the modern political world.”

      New Labour has a lot to answer for in this respect. How many proper opportunities did they give her in their thirteen years in government?

      ” She also appears to advocate ‘Old Labour’ ideas, of which I think this country has moved on from.”

      The country voted in Labour in 1997 for Labour to implement Labour ideas and ideals. The party was rebranded into New Labour and they turned out to be the poor mans Conservative Party. At least, Diane is still holding the true Labour values compared to the nonsense we have been fed with over the past thirteen years of a corrupt racist Labour Government. Also remember that the electorates were disillusioned with the idea of all the political parties sounding and being alike in their policies. Diane has brought us something different.

      ““Black” and “Female” should not be deemed the two most exiting things a candidate brings to a leadership election. It just doesn’t deliver the good people are looking for.”

      Absolutely. Content, character, integrity, vision etc; are just a few traits that a candidate and leader should have. Sadly, there has been no evidence of that from New Labour leaders over the past thirteen years. What a sad state of affairs.

      “Personally, I am not too convinced that any of the candidates can bring Labour back to an effective party.”

      Have they ever been an effective party, or, is it a case of the opposition parties presenting weaker challenges?

      “Diane Abbott has focused predominantly on attention rather than real politics and her focus expenses on the leadership election is losing money for Labour party and therefore to its detriment.”

      Diane is full of content with proper Labour values. Whatever the outcome of the Labour leadership, she has written her name in history for life.

      “It is also causing serious divisions within the party. ”

      Blame that on Tony and Gordon.

  3. He was notorious for The Reforms.

  4. Hello;

    Plese allow me to explain myself.

    Firstly, I do not think that Ed Miliband would be a good labour leader for the exact same reasons. It is much too late to be scoring points based on an untenable series of events. In fact, Ed Miliband is my least favourite candidate. He has absolutely no substance. I would say that, as much as Diane is the ‘wild-card’ of the election, I believe Diane has more substance and would, at the very least, make a more sincere leader.

    Ed Miliband’s over £7 ‘living wage’ is one of the most ridiculous and uninspiring policies I have heard in a long time. It is basically offense, to all working people, as it under-values the work that people do and, let’s face it, the sum isn’t much to live on. I would make him live on that wage, as an MP, and see how he would cope. His policy shows his lack of grasp on the most fundamental elements of the economy.

    Regarding Iraq: 122 MPs was definately not the majority of the labour party. Therefore, Ed and Diane do not represent the Labour majority.

    Al-Qaeda, it has been proven, did have a branch in Iraq. There have been testimonies of former Al-Qaeda members, who are now advising against the taliban, and evidence of operations bases.

    There is absolutely no way that the Iraqi people could overthrow Saddam. He, and his supporters, had a complete stranglehold. If the Iraqis could have done, they would have done so. It also appeared that no Middle-Eastern country would dare to oppose him.

    Hey, if any of you are nonchalant with regards to the atrocities committed by Saddam, I don’t want to know you as people. The world stage is too small and the right to a decent life is too important, life is also too short, for such people to be deemed ‘too far away for us to need worry’. These situations, for example, like that of Gaza, can never be considered a ‘it’s just the way it is’ situation.

    The government, or more directly, the Labour Party, does not exist for opportunities to be given to individuals. It is there for individuals who have already shown their own initiative and who have received popular support. Unfortunately for Diane, most people do not believe that she has shown the initiative, therefore she does not receive popular support.

    By ‘Old Labour’ I mean ’80s Labour. Diane Abbott shows the trends of being too concerned with righteousness, and the small issues, in politics rather than sensible realities. Her policies are, at times, simply an unrealistic pipe-dream. It does not appear that her policies are those researched by a team but simply those of her own personal decisions. We cannot just scrap trident because Diane thinks so; we need concrete studies. Unfortunately, this is a current trait, regarding policy decisions, that the other leaders appear to share.

    When I say that ‘Diane Abbott’s mannerisms are derived from her hyper-awareness of her physical traits’ I am referring to her awareness of being Black and Female, and perceived social trends, of which she uses to her advantage, even when such a practice is not apropriate. She has herself, unfortunately, showed a racially motivated undercurrent to her character with regards to some of the controversy she has been involved in (I’m not going to go into detail here). I also think that her apparent envy over other elements within the Labour party has, for a while, detracting from her potential. She does not appear to connect well with the majority of the Labour party, or the general public for that matter.

    I don’t believe that the MP above has any real malevolent intentions with regards to his actions. It appears that he has developed ‘political tourette’s syndrome’.

    I will reiterate: I do not condone the use of language and ‘clumsy delivery’, however, regardless of the fact that he is a Tory, I, and most of the country, loosely agree with this individual’s opinion that Diane Abbott would not make a decent Labour leader.

    I simply wonder if such an outburst is a result of agitation. It is possible that this individual’s agitation, and resulting outburst, has been a symptom of the fear of being tarred with the ‘racism’ brush over his opinions, particularly from OBV sympathisers. A lot of those people jump to the aid of Diane Abbott just because she’s Black, regardless of her policies. They appear to make excuses for her, due to the reasons above, and we do not need such a thing in politics. They are over-protective at times. Such people end up stifling intelligent debate.

    The best thing that we can have from a political leader is a good policy plan. After all, good policies, and good systems, can help remove the need for decision making by a political leader. It’s the most efficient way. Everybody wins.

  5. I return to my previous point about a presumed vendetta: “I simply wonder if such an outburst is a result of agitation. It is possible that this individual’s agitation, and resulting outburst, has been a symptom of the fear of being tarred with the ‘racism’ brush over his opinions, particularly from OBV sympathisers”.

    How about he is grown man in politics and if he does think that allegations can be made for political gain that he should may be more careful. I don’t think Hague is gay because he shared a room with a colleague, but I know that his political enemies within and beyond the party will make attempts to do so.

    I don’t think we need dirty tricks in politics either but I am slowing wondering if any political issue you see here can be segwayed in to an attack OBV and their allies.

    For the record, I’d never even heard of this guy, and think he has been naive and disrespectful. On the issue of ‘tarring’ with racism though, you could link the “intellectually illiterate” comment to notions of racial superiority, because this slur has been used before. It smacks of a high-brow version of Ron Atkinson describing Marcel Desailly as “thick”. Neither have a basis in fact but magically appear in verbal attacks on black people.

    That’s after the event of him ‘mis-speaking’, not before. Just like Diane Abbott (in reference to the Iraq War): I don’t believe in pre-emptive strikes.

    I agree that Saddam was a tyrant but perhaps you can agree we have societal amnesia regarding who created Saddam’s power and who advised companies to sell him machinery for weapons http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms-to-Iraq even after he was proved to have these on Kurdish people in the years prior to that? You have to admit that was kind of glossed over by pro-war advocates.

  6. “We cannot just scrap trident because Diane thinks so; we need concrete studies. Unfortunately, this is a current trait, regarding policy decisions, that the other leaders appear to share.”

    I agree in principle about hasty policy decisions Joshua, but if you were anti ID cards would you insist we spend more money carrying out concrete studies?
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/election_2010/8679072.stm

  7. Joshua,

    “Regarding Iraq: 122 MPs was definately not the majority of the labour party. Therefore, Ed and Diane do not represent the Labour majority.”

    I can’t recollect saying they were.

    “Al-Qaeda, it has been proven, did have a branch in Iraq. There have been testimonies of former Al-Qaeda members, who are now advising against the taliban, and evidence of operations bases. ”

    Can you back this point with some real evidence? Can you supply me with a link to an internet story backing up your point?

    “There is absolutely no way that the Iraqi people could overthrow Saddam. He, and his supporters, had a complete stranglehold. If the Iraqis could have done, they would have done so. It also appeared that no Middle-Eastern country would dare to oppose him.”

    The Iraqi people rose up to the coalition of the willing. Iraq was a lot peaceful under Saddam than it has been under the coalition of the willing. I am also mindful that democratic countries do not start wars. Lastly, in any civilized society its own citizens should decide who leads them – not a foreign force bombading them with cluster bombs of mass destruction and all other forms of dangerous weaponry.

    “The government, or more directly, the Labour Party, does not exist for opportunities to be given to individuals. It is there for individuals who have already shown their own initiative and who have received popular support. Unfortunately for Diane, most people do not believe that she has shown the initiative, therefore she does not receive popular support.”

    New Labour should have given her the same equal treatment that it has given to its white government ministers and three homosexual ministers (all white). The disparity couldn’t have been more obvious in this respect; especially as they deliberately left out Paul Boateng – the most senior minority ethnic MP at the time – from the cabinet. Racism within New Labour was clearly obvious for all to see. As for Diane, most objectors to her standing for leadership simply don’t want her there because of her colour and nothing else.

    “When I say that ‘Diane Abbott’s mannerisms are derived from her hyper-awareness of her physical traits’ I am referring to her awareness of being Black and Female, and perceived social trends, of which she uses to her advantage, even when such a practice is not apropriate. ”

    The same can be said of all the other candidates who have used whatever they have got to their own advantage. The only difference to me and other objectors to Miss Abbott is that I have accepted their nominations without any prejudice. Pity the same compliment cannot be returned to Miss Abbott.

    “She has herself, unfortunately, showed a racially motivated undercurrent to her character with regards to some of the controversy she has been involved in (I’m not going to go into detail here).”

    Without any red hot evidence to back up this assertion, it is going to be very hard to endorse it, or debate about it. Back it up with some evidence please.

    ” I also think that her apparent envy over other elements within the Labour party has, for a while, detracting from her potential. ”

    Cite some examples please.

    “She does not appear to connect well with the majority of the Labour party, or the general public for that matter.”

    She does not give me that impression at all. New Labour is a racist political party which has gone as far as hiding behind the Bnp to protect the public from knowing about it. New Labour’s track record on promoting non-whites within their party to top positions is disgraceful. While New Labour were in power, they continuously amended the Race Relations Act 1976 and have only succeeded in bringing racism back into society today. This intresting observation of yours highlights the racism within society which connects effectively to New Labour. Kudos to you for highlighting that.

    “I don’t believe that the MP above has any real malevolent intentions with regards to his actions. It appears that he has developed ‘political tourette’s syndrome’. ”

    He should concentrate on his own party’s interest instead of Diane Abbott’s nomination. The very good thing about his action is, despite your lack of belief in Diane, we actually see one person who sees her as a threat.

    ” however, regardless of the fact that he is a Tory, I, and most of the country, loosely agree with this individual’s opinion that Diane Abbott would not make a decent Labour leader.”

    Two like minded individuals both who see Diane as a threat. Very positive indeed.

    “I simply wonder if such an outburst is a result of agitation. It is possible that this individual’s agitation, and resulting outburst, has been a symptom of the fear of being tarred with the ‘racism’ brush over his opinions, particularly from OBV sympathisers.”

    He sounds like a racist to me. The fact that he is a young man who harbours such vitriol towards the only black candidate is a cause of concern to me. This is supposed to be a democracy.

    “A lot of those people jump to the aid of Diane Abbott just because she’s Black, regardless of her policies. They appear to make excuses for her, due to the reasons above, and we do not need such a thing in politics. They are over-protective at times. Such people end up stifling intelligent debate.”

    With sad sentiments like these, it is hard to believe that some of these people are descendants of those who abolished slave trade and defeated bigotry of this sort in the second world war.

    “The best thing that we can have from a political leader is a good policy plan. After all, good policies, and good systems, can help remove the need for decision making by a political leader. It’s the most efficient way. Everybody wins.”

    Added on to the qualities I believe a good leader – not just any political leader – should possess, yes I agree with you.

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