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Labour Force Survey: black unemployment up

Labour Force Survey

The majority of black and ethnic minority communities have seen big increases in the levels of unemployment and economic inactivity over the last 8 years according to the Labour Force Survey (LFS) data published this week.

This is of real concern as the levels of black unemployment among particular communities prior to the recession was already very high and any further increases could spell disaster for many communities throughout the country.

However, in looking in detail at the figures it is clear that the African, Caribbean Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities are bearing the brunt of the economic difficulties and associated effects of this recession.

Pakistani’s and Bangladeshi’s endure the highest rates of economic inactivity and compared to White Britons.

What do the statistics tell us?

Those who are neither in work or claiming benefit are deemed economically inactive (EI) by the LFS and are among Black British poorest communities.

  • For White British communities we have seen the EI rate remain relatively stable. In 2002 the rate was 20.7% and in 2010 the rate is 20.4%. White unemployment rose from 4.5% to 7.5%.
  • Black Caribbean’s have seen the EI rate drop from a high of 25.8 in 2002 to 19.7% in 2010 they also saw an unemployment rate that has climbed from 13% in 2002 to 15.4% today.
  • Whilst Black Africans have seen their rate of EI of 31.9% drop marginally to 31.5% in 2010 they have seen their unemployment rate increase from 13.9% in 2002 to 15.3% in 2010.
  • For Pakistanis the EI rate in 2002 was a jaw dropping 49.6% falling marginally to 43% today with an unemployment rate of 17.9% in 2002 now grown to 18.8% in 2010.
  • For Bangladeshi’s the EI rate was highest of any ethnic group 53.3% in 2002 and reduced to 46.2% today with an unemployment rate in 2002 of 21.4% falling to 16.4% in 2010.
  • For White and Asian category  we see an EI rate of 32.4% in 2002 drop to 30.1% in 2010.
  • Unemployment for this group was 16.7% in the final quarter of 2009 no preceding figures are available in addition this year are as yet available.

These are incredibly worrying figures with further increases in Black and ethnic minority unemployment expected as a result of the public sector cuts. Add to this the withdrawal of much needed public and voluntary sector services then the scenario becomes much more worrying.

In the weeks and months ahead the Coalition Government will need to explain how it intends to tackle the prospect of increased levels of unemployment and higher levels of economic inactivity for these communities.

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3 Responses

  1. […] Labour Force Survey: black unemployment up […]

  2. “The majority of black and ethnic minority communities have seen big increases in the levels of unemployment and economic inactivity over the last 8 years according to the Labour Force Survey”

    This is under a Labour Government.

    “This is of real concern as the levels of black unemployment among particular communities prior to the recession was already very high and any further increases could spell disaster for many communities throughout the country.”

    The Employment Tribunal Service are making a significant contribution to this problem.

    “In the weeks and months ahead the Coalition Government will need to explain how it intends to tackle the prospect of increased levels of unemployment and higher levels of economic inactivity for these communities.”

    In order for the coalition government to be able to tackle this problem effectively, I welcome them to ask the Employment Tribunal Service to provide the following details:

    1. The number of claims for Racial Discrimination made to the Employment Tribunals since October 2004 to present, the ethnic background of the claimants, and the outcome to their claims.

    2. The number of claims made for Racial Discrimination and Victimisation made to the Employment Tribunals since October 2004 to present, the ethnic background of all claimants and the outcome to their claims (4 February 2010).

    (Refused.
    Refused by Employment Tribunals Service to Yinka Oyesanya on 15 January 2010.)

    3. Can you kindly supply me with information of the number of unfair dismissal claims brought to Employment Tribunals since October 2004 to date, the number of successful and unsuccessful claims, and the ethnic backgrounds of the applicants? (18 October 2009)

    “The request was refused by Employment Tribunals Service.”

    These key questions will never be answered by even the present government because it will reveal very embarassing results. The actions of a very deplorable Labour Government coupled with the actions of an Employment Tribunal Service; carrying out bad policies from that government, have greatly contributed to the increase in unemployment among minority ethnic groups.

    • What are the Employment Tribunal Service hiding by their refusal to supply the following information I requested under the Freedom of Information Act?

      Why have they deliberately targeted minority ethnic communities?

      Who in the last government set up such a heidious system, and why is he/she not explaining to us, the logic behind it?

      What is this present government going to do about this problem?

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