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Tribute to Jan Carew

Jan Carew

A tribute event is to be held tomorrow in honour of the Caribbean intellectual Jan Carew.
Best known for his seminal novel Black Midas, Carew was also a founding father of Britain’s Black Power Movement, publishing and editing the paper Magnet.
Born 24 September 1920 in Guyana, Carew is a novelist, playwright, poet and educator. His poetry and first two novels, Black Midas and The Wild Coast, were significant landmarks of the West Indian literature then attempting through writing to cope with its colonial past and assert its wish for autonomy. Carew also played an important part within the Black movement gaining strength in England and North America, publishing reviews and newspapers, producing programs and plays for the radio and the television.
A. Sivanandan of the Institute of Race Relations, said of Carew: “Jan heralded and helped to shape the cultural revolution against colonialism and racism in poetry, painting, polemic and play. A wandering minstrel uprooted and cast abroad by the imperial imperative, he rooted himself wherever he was in the struggles of the people around him. And he was in many places, wearing many faces, but always in the same cause: freedom for the oppressed and downtrodden – teaching, writing, broadcasting, engaging with mighty men and women such as Malcolm X and Claudia Jones, Cheddi Jagan and Kwame Nkrumah, Paul Robeson and Langston Hughes.”

Reception and Tribute evening for Jan Carew
Tuesday 11 May 2010, 6-8.30pm
The Tabernacle, Powis Square, London W11 2AY

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