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The State of Black Britain

SBBS 2010 - 10am-5pm on October 9th

Church, community and business leaders will gather at a symposium to discuss routes to achieving a healthier and wealthier future.

The State of Black Britain Symposium (SBBS) 2010 is where a raft of high-profile guests will assemble to work through this year’s theme, Health & Wealth – An Agenda for Black Britain.

The government’s bleak economic forecast and pending spending cuts makes the theme a timely agenda to discuss measures to buffer austerity.

Among the speakers are Muyiwa, who is a singer, songwriter and broadcaster for Premier Radio and Lufthansa Airlines; and BBC radio presenter, publisher and co-founder of Colourtelly, Dotun Adebayo MBE.

Other experts include Dr Viviane Lafar-Cissé – currently transitional lead for the NHS National BME Network and influential businessman Ken Olisa OBE, chair of merchant bank Restoration Partners and director at Thomson Reuters.

SBBS is the brain-child of The Revd David Shosanya. David currently serves as a Regional Minister with the London Baptist Association and is a co-founder of the nationally acclaimed Street Pastors Initiative.

Experts will present and facilitate inspiring seminars and workshops on healthy communities, bodies, finances, entrepreneurship, technology and healthy life options.

In addition, a representative of the Olympic Delivery Authority will make a special presentation on business and volunteering opportunities related to the 2012 Olympics.

The SBBS 2010 – 10am-5pm on October 9.  The Keyworth Centre, London South Bank University, London SE1. info@thestateofblackbritainsymposium.com

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4 Responses

  1. “Church, community and business leaders will gather at a symposium to discuss routes to achieving a healthier and wealthier future.”

    Black people should start to love and respect each other and their own selves before we can see an improvement in our fortunes,

  2. I can partly agree. One must not ignore the root of our hatred. Our root is the cause and the effect can’ve a solution when the root begins to resolve its problem.

    In Africa, where the so-called Blacks originate, has a deep problem. Her rulers, not leaders, in ruling things often treat their fellow human beings as things to rule.

    Humans are humans despite their socio-economic state of being. Thus when we speak of loving ourselves outside Africa, without doing something there to redress the evils of hateful rulers, we can hardly have the expected results. But it’s good to start from somewhere!

    I have written some poems in my “Poetic Songs of Modern Africa”, to promote love and service in there. It’s available at http://www.Amazon.co.uk. It’s packed with ideas to solve most of our hateful attitudes to each other. The fear of my neighbour having improved and better life than me?

    Kind regards
    Paah Young
    (A believer in social-justice in Africa in our lives time)

  3. “In Africa, where the so-called Blacks originate, has a deep problem. Her rulers, not leaders, in ruling things often treat their fellow human beings as things to rule.”

    That’s a global phenomenon Pash, I think the verse in the UK National Anthem actually celebrates that fact “born to reign over us”. Not for us, with us, or by us, but over us.

    I agree, the “the root of our hatred” is something to look at. I’ll be in touch if I can find the way to do so.

  4. 2 corrections: Paah, not Pash. Long, not Born.

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